Tag: landscape

Rotorua Geothermal

Rotorua is one of the world’s most spectacular Geothermal Wonderlands. It is part of the Taupo Volcanic Zone, a geothermal field extending from White Island off the Bay of Plenty Coast to Mt Ruapehu far to the south. Rotorua’s array of geothermal features – volcanic crater lakes, spouting geysers, bubbling mud pools, hissing fumaroles and colourful sinter terraces – are sure to impress.

Rotorua Geothermal.png

 Rotorua’s geothermal wonderland and the volcanic activity has drawn visitors since the 1800s and remains a huge draw card at spectacular thermal parks.

These include Te Puia, where the Pohutu geyser is the star of the Whakarewarewa Valley erupting up to 20 times a day to heights of 30m. Wai-O-Tapu Thermal Wonderland – well known for its colourful waters and the famed Chamapagne Pool; Hells Gate is renowned for its mud baths and Waimangu Volcanic Valley is the youngest geothermal eco-system in the world.

How to Photograph Waterfalls

Waterfalls are beautiful but technically difficult to photograph. Discover how to master the technical and creative aspects of waterfall photography.

Capture Their Motion

One of the most interesting things about waterfalls is the way they move. From the meandering flow of water across rocks to the splash and spray of a crashing torrent, they’re always full of energy and excitement.

The key to capturing this movement is choosing the best camera settings before you start shooting. So flick your camera into Shutter Priority or Manual mode and set it up as follows.

Purakaunui Falls New Zealand.jpg

Purakaunui Falls – New Zealand

Shutter Speed

Every waterfall is different, and there’s no single “correct” shutter speed to use, but if you want to capture movement in the water you’ll need to use a slow shutter speed – generally somewhere from 0.3 seconds up to several seconds.

Continue reading “How to Photograph Waterfalls”