Tag: nature

Rotorua Geothermal

Rotorua is one of the world’s most spectacular Geothermal Wonderlands. It is part of the Taupo Volcanic Zone, a geothermal field extending from White Island off the Bay of Plenty Coast to Mt Ruapehu far to the south. Rotorua’s array of geothermal features – volcanic crater lakes, spouting geysers, bubbling mud pools, hissing fumaroles and colourful sinter terraces – are sure to impress.

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 Rotorua’s geothermal wonderland and the volcanic activity has drawn visitors since the 1800s and remains a huge draw card at spectacular thermal parks.

These include Te Puia, where the Pohutu geyser is the star of the Whakarewarewa Valley erupting up to 20 times a day to heights of 30m. Wai-O-Tapu Thermal Wonderland – well known for its colourful waters and the famed Chamapagne Pool; Hells Gate is renowned for its mud baths and Waimangu Volcanic Valley is the youngest geothermal eco-system in the world.

Tiritiri Matangi Island

Tiritiri Matangi Island is a wildlife sanctuary located 30km north east of central Auckland accessible by ferry.
The island boasts an impressive array of native birds from Kiwi to Kokako as well as breathtaking scenery. You can choose to take a guided tour or guide your self around the island. Highlights you must check out are Fishermans Bay and the Arches on the eastern side of the island as well as Hobbs Beach (a nice place to swim).

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Travelling from Auckland or Whangaparaoa to Tiritiri Matangi, the typical ‘whitish’ cliffs of the Auckland area shine out in the sun. These are the familiar ‘Waitemata Group’ rocks. They are made up of mainly alternating layers of sandstone and mudstone, interspersed irregularly with thick beds of volcanic debris flows.

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Portraits Of The Maori People

Stunning Portraits Of The Maori People By Photographer Jimmy Nelson.

The long and intriguing story of the origins of the indigenous Maori people can be traced back to the 13th century, the mythical homeland Hawaiki, Eastern Polynesia. Due to centuries of isolation, the Maori established a distinct society with characteristic art, a separate language and unique mythology.

maori people 10.jpgDefining aspects of Maori traditional culture include art, dance, legends, tattoos and community. While the arrival of European colonists in the 18th century had a profound impact on the Maori way of life, many aspects of traditional society have survived into the 21st century.

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Punakaiki Pancake Rocks

The pancake rocks are the most visited natural attraction on the West Coast with good reason. These ancient formations are a true wonder of nature – and they really do look like pancakes!

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Nature began this work of art about 30 million years ago. Over thousands of years, alternating layers of small marine creatures and sand became buried and compressed on the ocean floor. This created areas with multiple layers of hard limestone and softer sandstone.

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Flower Photography Tips

Flowers are beautiful and attractive. They can bring us inspiration, peace, and stir many other powerful emotions. 

You don’t have to be a professional photographer to capture great flower pictures, whether you want to show off the splendor of a rose in your garden or shoot pictures of flowers during your travels. Flower photos allow you to create vividly colorful images that will grab the attention of everyone! And best of all, you can shoot great-looking flower photos with almost any kind of camera. Here are some secrets.

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1: Lighting

It can be tempting to wait for the brightest midday sun to take your flower pictures. That’s actually one of the worst times, because the powerful sunlight will wash out your image, and can create harsh shadows.

Instead, take flower pictures when it’s overcast, or in the morning, afternoon or evening when the sun isn’t as bright and overpowering. This will result in more saturated colors in the blooms of the flowers.

Take photos of flowers on overcast days. Clouds are mother nature’s diffuser, they cut out direct light and diffuse it into a softer, more gentle lighting that will make your flower photography look great.

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New Zealand Rainforest

About 1–15% of the total land area of New Zealand is covered with native flora, from tall kauri and kohekohe forests to rainforest dominated by rimu, beech, tawa, matai and rata; ferns and flax; dunelands with their spinifex and pingao; alpine and subalpine herb fields; and scrub and tussock.

Arataki Visitor Centre

The Arataki Visitor Centre is the gateway to the Waitakere Ranges Regional Park in West Auckland, with more than 16,000 hectares of native rainforest and coastline. It’s 250km of walking and tramping tracks provide access to beaches, breathtaking views, and spectacular rocky outcrops, including the Hillary Trail, black sand beaches, waterfalls and giant kauri trees.

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How to Photograph Waterfalls

Waterfalls are beautiful but technically difficult to photograph. Discover how to master the technical and creative aspects of waterfall photography.

Capture Their Motion

One of the most interesting things about waterfalls is the way they move. From the meandering flow of water across rocks to the splash and spray of a crashing torrent, they’re always full of energy and excitement.

The key to capturing this movement is choosing the best camera settings before you start shooting. So flick your camera into Shutter Priority or Manual mode and set it up as follows.

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Purakaunui Falls – New Zealand

Shutter Speed

Every waterfall is different, and there’s no single “correct” shutter speed to use, but if you want to capture movement in the water you’ll need to use a slow shutter speed – generally somewhere from 0.3 seconds up to several seconds.

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