Tag: photography tips

Flower Photography Tips

Flowers are beautiful and attractive. They can bring us inspiration, peace, and stir many other powerful emotions. 

You don’t have to be a professional photographer to capture great flower pictures, whether you want to show off the splendor of a rose in your garden or shoot pictures of flowers during your travels. Flower photos allow you to create vividly colorful images that will grab the attention of everyone! And best of all, you can shoot great-looking flower photos with almost any kind of camera. Here are some secrets.

flower photography 01.jpg

1: Lighting

It can be tempting to wait for the brightest midday sun to take your flower pictures. That’s actually one of the worst times, because the powerful sunlight will wash out your image, and can create harsh shadows.

Instead, take flower pictures when it’s overcast, or in the morning, afternoon or evening when the sun isn’t as bright and overpowering. This will result in more saturated colors in the blooms of the flowers.

Take photos of flowers on overcast days. Clouds are mother nature’s diffuser, they cut out direct light and diffuse it into a softer, more gentle lighting that will make your flower photography look great.

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How to Photograph Waterfalls

Waterfalls are beautiful but technically difficult to photograph. Discover how to master the technical and creative aspects of waterfall photography.

Capture Their Motion

One of the most interesting things about waterfalls is the way they move. From the meandering flow of water across rocks to the splash and spray of a crashing torrent, they’re always full of energy and excitement.

The key to capturing this movement is choosing the best camera settings before you start shooting. So flick your camera into Shutter Priority or Manual mode and set it up as follows.

Purakaunui Falls New Zealand.jpg

Purakaunui Falls – New Zealand

Shutter Speed

Every waterfall is different, and there’s no single “correct” shutter speed to use, but if you want to capture movement in the water you’ll need to use a slow shutter speed – generally somewhere from 0.3 seconds up to several seconds.

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